CED

June 2015

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>> GOOD COMPANY JOANNE COSTIN W hen Randy Strait first devel- oped his snow-pusher plow, he was only trying to find a way to save time, reduce expenses and make more money as a snow-plowing contractor. "I designed and built the snow-pusher for my own use," said the CEO of Arctic Snow and Ice Control, a commercial snowplowing company serving the Chicagoland area. Strait started in the commercial snowplowing business in 1978 and over the years grew the business from a one-man operation to one with more than 300 employees and 400 snow- pushers. In 2006, he was so tired of all the problems he experienced tradi- tional rubber-edged snow-pushers he decided to design something that would work far better. A unique design solves traditional box plow problems e traditional one piece box plow designs that were the industry standard in 2006 had blades made of rubber. at way if the blade hit a manhole cover, it would give. e problem with a rubber edge is that it also had a tendency to tear. And the one-piece design was not effective in reaching the low sections of a parking lot. e straight edge would skim over the top of low spots leaving inches of snow unplowed. A smaller snow plow would have to finish off the snow clearing work or a heavy application of road salt would be required to melt the snow. Neither method was cost efficient or productive. Strait solved the problem with a patented sectional snow-pusher made out of 32-inch moldboard sections. If the pusher hits a manhole cover or other unseen obstacle, one moldboard section trips over the obstacle, while the other sections remain contoured to the surface. A patented slip hitch ensures full traction while the moldboard continually adjusts to the pavement. Steel cutting edges scrape compacted snow and ice down to the pavement, eliminating the need for follow-up plowing and repairs of torn rubber. With each section working with the effectiveness of a smaller plow, parking lots are cleared faster and less salt is needed to melt remain- ing snow. Maintenance costs are reduced because repairs are confined to one section of the plow, not the entire unit. Fuel and labor costs are also reduced. Strait didn't stop there. e rigid side panels of the conventional snow- pusher were also replaced with panels that move up and down over parking lot curbs and islands. is solved the problems of excessive wear on the shoe near the side panel, bent snow plows and damaged concrete. From contractor to manufacturer Aer seeing how productive Arctic was with its new snow-pusher, competitors started asking Strait to build snow-pushers for them. "My snow plowing business couldn't grow because I couldn't build the snow-pushers fast enough," added Strait. In 2008, the manufactur- ing arm of the business, Arctic Snow and Ice Products, opened a 144,000-square-foot manufactur- ing facility in Bradley, Ill. Today, the plant is running two shis to meet demand for 12 models of snow-pushers in various sizes built for compact equipment, light- duty equipment and heavy-duty equipment. e snow-pushers can be mounted on skid-steer loaders, Blow Away Snow Plow Problems A contractor's desire to find a better way to plow snow becomes the foundation of a manufacturing business. 44 | www.cedmag.com | Construction Equipment Distribution | June 2015 "People buy my plow because there is cost justification. It will reduce your salt usage 50 percent." The Arctic Sectional Snow-Pusher Line CD Series Pushers Compatible with small skid-steers, compact tractors and small wheel loaders Up to 5,000 pounds LD Series Pushers Compatible with several types of lighter- duty equipment including backhoes, skid steers, compact loaders, and tractors Less than 15,000 pounds HD Series Pushers Compatible with wheel loaders, backhoes, skid-steers, tractors and telehandlers. More than 18,000 pounds Randy Strait President & CEO Arctice Snow and Ice Control

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