City Trees

May/June 2014

Issue link: https://read.dmtmag.com/i/306909

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ÌÞÊ/Àiià :OO ARBORISTS AND MUNICIPAL ARBORISTS SHARE IN COMMON THE NEED FOR HIGHLEVEL COMMUNICATION SKILLS THE PURSUIT OF EXCELLENT TREE CARE AMID A MYRIAD OF ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES AND THE ABILITY TO PERFORM WORK SAFELY IN SENSITIVE AREAS 4HE CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS 2OUNDTABLE ARE PROFESSIONAL MEMBERS OF THE !SSOCIATION OF :OOLOGICAL (ORTICULTURE !:( WWWAZHORG 4 HE LIFE OF A TREE IN THE ZOO ENVIRONMENT CAN BE TOUGH 4HANKFULLY THERE ARE MANY TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES THAT CAN IMPROVE AND MAINTAIN PROPER TREE HEALTH !T .APLES :OO ACRES HA AT #ARIBBEAN 'ARDENS IN .APLES &LORIDA WE HAVE A UNIQUE COMBINATION OF HISTORICAL AND TROPICAL SPECIMENS THAT TELL A STORY ABOUT THE PROPERTY AS WELL AS CREATE A LUSH AND BEAUTIFUL BACKDROP FOR THE ANIMALS AND EXHIBITS -ANY OF OUR SPECIMEN TREES WERE PLANTED IN THE EARLY S BY $R (ENRY .EHRLING AND MIDCENTURY BY *ULIUS &LEISCHMANN /UR CLIMATE ALLOWS FOR MANY SPECIES INCLUDING THOSE IN THE GENERA &ICUS #EIBA 4ECTONIA 0TEROCARPUS #EDRUS AND !URACARIA /UR TREES AT THE ZOO SERVE MANY FUNCTIONS BEAUTY SHADE FOR ANIMALS AND GUESTS FOOD FOR THE ANIMALS TO BROWSE PERCHING SITES FOR BIRDS SCRATCHING POSTS FOR TIGERS AND hFURNITUREv THAT ENCOURAGES ANIMALS TO EXPLORE AND BE ACTIVE -ANAGING THE TREE CANOPY IN A ZOO ENVIRONMENT REQUIRES ORGANIZATION AND CONSISTENT MONITORING 3AFETY OF THE ANIMAL COLLECTION AND THE ZOO GUESTS IS ALWAYS A PRIOR ITY &REQUENT INSPECTIONS AND DOCUMENTATION SERVE TO ENSURE SPECIMENS ARE HEALTHY AND CONCERNS CAN BE ADDRESSED PROMPTLY 3OIL COMPACTION IS A FREQUENT ISSUE IN THE ZOO ENVI RONMENT -ANY TREE SPECIMENS ARE LOCATED BETWEEN EXHIBITS ADJACENT TO PUBLIC PATHWAYS AND FACILITIES AND WITHIN EVENT SPACES 4HIS MEANS THEY ARE SUBJECT TO CONSTANT FOOT TRAFFIC FROM GUESTS STAFF ANDOR ANIMALS CONSTRUCTION ALSO COMPACTS THE SOIL 7E HAVE USED AN AIRPOWERED EXCAVATOR AT THE ZOO TO REVERSE SOIL COMPAC TION ISSUES AND GET FERTILIZATION TO THE ROOT SYSTEM !CCESS TO MANY SPECIMENS CAN BE DIFFICULT BECAUSE OF ADJACENT STRUCTURES SUCH AS RESTROOMS PLAYGROUNDS FOOD AREAS OR ANIMAL EXHIBITS 4REE WORK SUCH AS PRUN ING OR ROOT THERAPY REQUIRES PLANNING AND GOOD COM MUNICATION AMONG HORTICULTURE ANIMAL AND OPERATIONS STAFF !NIMALS MAY NEED TO BE OFFEXHIBIT AND THIS CAN NEGATIVELY IMPACT THE GUESTS EXPERIENCE AS THEY DO COME TO SEE THE ANIMALS /N THE PLUS SIDE SIGNAGE AND INTERPRETATION OF THE TREE 3 0 6 / % 5 " # - & 4QFDJBM$IBMMFOHFTPG6SCBO'PSFTUSZJO;PPT /iÃiÊVÊ>ÀÃiÌÃÊiÞÊ`iÃÌÀÞ}ÊÌÀiiÃÊvÀÊÌiÀÊÃ>«°Ê *ÌÊLÞÊivvÊ-ÃÊ ÊÀÊV«iÌiÃÊÃÊiÝV>Û>ÌÊ«ÀiVÌ°Ê*ÌÊLÞÊivvÊ-à À}Ì®ÊÊ>ÀLÀÃÌÊ«ÀÕiÃÊ>ÊÌÀiiÊÊÌiÊiÀÞÊ6>ÃÊ<ÊÛ>ÀÞ°Ê *ÌÊLÞÊ`>ÊÛiÃÊ WORK BEING PERFORMED CAN SERVE TO EDUCATE ZOO GUESTS AND EVEN STAFF ON PROPER PRUNING AND PLANT HEALTH CARE TECHNIQUES AND PEST AND DISEASE CONTROL 3IGNAGE ALSO EDUCATES ZOO GUESTS ABOUT HOW SOME TREES PROVIDE BROWSE FOR THE ANIMALS ±%BOJFMMF-(SFFO%JSFDUPS PG(BSEFOT(SPVOET/BQMFT;PPBU$BSJCCFBO(BSEFOT /BQMFT'MPSJEB

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